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Bruin Design Works
Sean Archer Photoshop Action video
Isometric drawing in Illustrator - tutorial
Tom Green on this training: This just made my day:I have used other training guides in the past. Been a subscriber to Lynda.om for ages as well. I am new to XD and was feeling a bit overwhelmed. Even with Adobe tutorials. THIS should be a primer for all new users of XD with minimal Adobe experience. It is well thought out and easy to follow even if you don't have the downloads. It is just so easy to watch. There are even items that I never thought would exist in XD. (Alexa integration). This is an ABSOLUTE MUST WATCH! This tutorial actually made me feel it is something I can take on. I am so motivated right now!
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I'm unlocking my ‘Iconography’ course so you can watch it for FREE using the link below. From the time you click the link to start you have 24hrs. Learn best practices for designing icons to retain continuity and clarity of communication. http://bit.ly/IconographyCourse
Azalea Festival Art Show Competition
  • ALL students, regardless of the Adobe program you are studying, are required to do this challenge. Photoshop, InDesign, or Illustrator are the preferred programs for this challenge.
    Final digital file due Friday, April 12 no exceptions.
  • Featuring the four colors above, you are going to create a work of art. Selected art will be printed, framed, and entered in the juried Azalea Festival Art Show.
  • Start by setting up the four swatches in your program using the hex codes above. You MUST incorporate ALL four of the colors in your design. Learn how to do it HERE. You can also get the swatches file (Azalea.ASE) on a flash drive from Ms. Durkin, then go to Swatches>Load Swatches. Other colors are allowed but do not have other colors dominate the design.
  • Final Art Size 8.25"x11.75" (594x846px), 300ppi, .jpg format
  • Explore textures, brushes, type, blending modes, opacity, filters, collages- Let your creativity run wild! USE LAYERS and name your layers! BEFORE you do a Google search, explore the free resources HERE.
  • Stuck for ideas? Check out this poster made by Durkin.
  • Check out Brain Buffet's creativity page
Linked-in Learning Link: https://www.linkedin.com/mynetwork/
Nikon Learn & Explore
PROJECT 1: DESIGN FOR GREATER GOOD CAMPAIGN Assignment: Create a public-awareness campaign with a message that promotes a social cause or issue—something for “the greater good” of society. Your message could be an overall public awareness campaign or a call to specific action. Your point of view may highlight the positive or negative aspects of your chosen topic. Your campaign must consist of a series of at least two (or more if you choose) large-format (bus shelter) posters. Consider who your audience is and how you would like to speak to them. In addition, you must demonstrate your campaign “in situ” by stripping your posters into (your original on-location photography) bus shelter photographs. You could design more than two posters—and extend your system to a possible object or “tchotchke” that makes sense within your overall campaign (T-shirt, tote bag, other promotional object). Objective: Students must demonstrate the concept of a series—or a design system—over the course of all posters and/or extensions/tchotchkes. What elements hold an effective public awareness campaign together? What makes a successful campaign memorable? Ideally, these four elements together make up the “look and feel” of the campaign: 1) conceptual approach; 2) execution of concept; 3) overall sense of typography; 4) overall sense of coloration.Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 3800-3811). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition.
How-to Video on Sean Archer Portrait Lightroom presets & brushes
Faculty assess eduring understanind through performance - through critical judgements made throughout the design process not through tests. (location 939)

two types of knowledge - things to be familiar with and skills (location 951)

Learning outcomes are even more precise than objectives and describe: 1) the acquisition of knowledge, skills, and dispositions expected of students; 20 the ways in which students will demonstrate these competencies; and 3) criteria for evaluating student success. (location 1271)

observable, measurable behaviors

Design always resides within a context defined by physical, social, cultural, technological, and economic factors. Although the specfific natures of these conditions mya change, the importance of context in solving design problems is a certainty. And while technologies will evolve, all have instrinsic affordances and require that desig

It is through the repetition and shuffling of relationships among variables in constantly changing problem contexts that students build design knowledge (location 1476)

.Davis, Meredith. Teaching Design: A Guide to Curriculum and Pedagogy for College Design Faculty and Teachers Who Use Design in Their Classrooms (Kindle Locations 1476-1477). Allworth. Kindle Edition.ners make critical judgments about their appropriateness in application. (Location 1370)

Urgency in addressing the effects of climate change and resource depletion; globalization in the design, production, and distribution of products; and growing concern for social innovationDavis, Meredith. Teaching Design: A Guide to Curriculum and Pedagogy for College Design Faculty and Teachers Who Use Design in Their Classrooms (Kindle Locations 1951-1952). Allworth. Kindle Edition.

Csikszentmihalyi inventories the mental steps in the creative process: preparation in a set of issues that arises from curiosity, personal experience, or presented or discovered problems; incubation during which ideas percolate beneath the surface of consciousness; insight in which a good idea rises to the surface because it fits the problem well; evaluation in which the thinker decides if the idea is worth pursuing; and elaboration through which the thinker communicates the idea to others (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996).Davis, Meredith. Teaching Design: A Guide to Curriculum and Pedagogy for College Design Faculty and Teachers Who Use Design in Their Classrooms (Kindle Locations 2225-2228). Allworth. Kindle Edition.

Therefore, learning outcomes that address students’ critical thinking across activities in design include the ability to: raise essential questions about the problem and frame them clearly and coherently; separate relevant from irrelevant information in the analysis of the problem; reach well-reasoned conclusions; test ideas against the constraints of the problem; and consider alternative points of view.Davis, Meredith. Teaching Design: A Guide to Curriculum and Pedagogy for College Design Faculty and Teachers Who Use Design in Their Classrooms (Kindle Locations 2264-2266). Allworth. Kindle Edition.

Plagiarism and cheating of any kind in the course of academic work will not be tolerated. Academic honesty includes accurate use of quotations, as well as appropriate and explicit citation of sources in instances of paraphrasing and describing ideas, or reporting on research findings or any aspect of the work of others (including that of instructors and other students). These standards of academic honesty and citation of sources apply to all forms of academic work (examinations, essays, theses, computer work, art and design work, oral presentations, and other projects).Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate

By the end of this course, students will be able to: •   Communicate in visual terms. •   Design within constraints of project specifications. •   Identify the design specifications including fonts, colors, graphics, and layouts. •   Articulate their own personal style or marketing goals/positioning. •   Present a portfolio of work in a professional manner. •   Evaluate their own work and the work of their peers based on objective design principles.Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 382-388). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition. and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 153-157). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition.

The class will operate as a studio where students are expected to present ideas, sketches, and design iterations thoughtfully and with intention. Some projects will overlap with each other, which will require students to develop their sense of project management. Students are expected to work in class as well as independently.Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 392-394). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition.

GOALS The primary course goal is to develop an understanding of the methods employed in solving communications problems in graphic design, advertising, illustration, computer graphics, photography, film, and video professions. It is also a goal of the courses to develop the understanding that communication is an active process between people and not just a statement of the artist’s self-expression or the passive appreciation of it. It will be shown that in order for us to act, we must interpret the significance of the information before us and therefore participate in the communication process.Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 515-520). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition.

“A graphic designer maintains a perspective based upon an awareness of fundamental principles, self-criticism, and a process-oriented approach to his or her work. From this vantage point, he or she understands the implications and connections between form, media, and information, and possesses the flexibility and inventiveness to address the ever-expanding body of knowledge and complexity of our culture.” (Paul Rand) When conveying information, it is our mission to develop a clear and effective picture for our audience. As with music, design can set a mood, generate tension, surprise, or calm; it can startle or seduce. We must communicate information through form, color, texture, and visual symbols.Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 1578-1583). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition.

EXPECTATIONS Our role: I think of this class as a tacit agreement between us. I ask you to do a set of tasks meant to increase your awareness, skill, and knowledge. Each task will be described with clarity and supported by examples. I expect you to listen with an open mind and to do what is asked of you. If you do not understand, or think that another way is better, you are always encouraged to say so. We are engaged in an actual and theoretical dialog where, together, all of us can learn. I expect you to try your best; to take a genuine interest in the subject at hand; to ask questions, volunteer thoughts and opinions; and above all, to participate. I also expect you to treat each other (and me) with kindness, courtesy, and respect. Being in class: This dialog can only be successful with your full attention. This means engaging with the work at hand and bringing all of you to class—your body/mind/awareness. Web surfing at random, email, texting in class—though these have become an essential part of life—are distractions from our goal and are, therefore, not permitted. Use of your laptop during class time is only for taking notes or for working on our assigned class work.Teaching Graphic Design: Course Offerings and Class Projects from the Leading Graduate and Undergraduate Programs (Kindle Locations 3156-3166). Allworth Press. Kindle Edition.